Paul Katsafanas’ The Nietzschean Self: Moral Psychology, Agency, and the Unconscious – Review By Richard J. Elliott

The recent publication of Paul Katsafanas’s The Nietzschean Self establishes a benchmark for conducting systematic studies of Nietzsche. By treating Nietzsche’s sporadic and often prima facie contradictory remarks on human agency in this well-considered study, Katsafanas successfully posits Nietzsche as an important contributor to philosophical issues surrounding the questions of human agency. Katsafanas claims that

Read More

Élodie Boublil and Christine Daigle’s (eds.), Nietzsche and Phenomenology: Power, Life, Subjectivity – Review By James Walter Bodington

Nietzsche and Phenomenology: Power, Life, Subjectivity is a collection of wide-ranging and thought-provoking literature on the nature of the relationship between Nietzsche and the phenomenological tradition. While more attention is devoted to Husserl than any other figure in phenomenology, there is a considerable amount of material on Merleau-Ponty and Heidegger as well as occasional forays

Read More

Paul Reitter and Chad Wellmon’s (ed.s) Friedrich Nietzsche, Anti-Education: On the Future of Our Educational Institutions – Review By Daniel Blue

New York Review Books has just issued a new translation of Nietzsche’s “On the Future of Our Educational Institutions” (along with two associated texts), using the comprehensive header, Anti-Education. Although the overall title is not Nietzsche’s and raises concerns, the book itself is intelligently conceived and executed with flair. This is good news, for of

Read More

A Bizzarre Individualism: A Cartography of Nietzsche’s Existential Rendering of the Individual By Adam T. Kingsmith

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself. –Friedrich Nietzsche, Untimely Mediations, but also titled as Unfashionable Observations, (1876). Introduction What is

Read More

Contributors’s Bios

Seth Binsted studied Philosophy in the graduate department at Stony Brook University. His academic work has focused on both Nietzsche and phenomenological philosophy. Under these headings, his research interests include aesthetics and architecture, pain, technology, and poetics. He is primarily interested in the variegated intersections between philosophy and the imagination. Nicholas Birns is Associate Professor

Read More

The Art of Affirmation By Kimerer LaMothe

I have learned many things from American dancer Isadora Duncan, even though she died decades before I was born. One was how to read the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. In Nietzsche’s books, from first to last, the word “dance” appears again and again, most often when he is writing about one of his primary concerns:

Read More